Develop technology tools to improve access to justice for those in vulnerable situations and those who aim to provide support.

Hackathon participants will identify and create law practice-based technology solutions to roadblocks in access to justice that apply to one of three domestic violence use cases: legal conflict prevention and escape preparation; emergency crisis support; and post-crisis support.


AGENDA
Saturday, March 12: Hack Day 1

9:30 am – 5:00 pm

Chicago Kent Law School

9:30am: Breakfast Served

10:00: Opening Greetings

10:05: Presentation of Event Agenda and Goals

10:20: Current justice system design presentation

10:30: Talk – Domestic Violence Survivors and Support Providers

Survivors discuss their personal experiences working with the justice system in dealing with domestic violence prevention, crisis support, redress, and rehabilitation.

10:45: Overview of work process and Q&A

11:00am: Team Formation and Work State

1pm: Lunch Served

5:00pm: End of Hack Day 1

**Mentors and Subject Matter Experts available all day.

**Coffee, beverages and snacks provided all day.

TBD: Offsite location for coding and work throughout the night.

Sunday, March 13th: Hack Day 2

10:00 am – 6:00 pm

Chicago Kent Law School

10:00 am: Breakfast served (Coffee and Snacks Provided All Day)

10:30: Start work group work

12-1pm: Lunch Served

4:00pm: Presentations Begin

6:15 pm: Judges deliberate / Snacks and beverages served

6:45pm: Evening Awards and Closing

**Mentors and Subject Matter Experts available all day.

**Coffee, beverages and snacks provided all day.

View full rules

Eligibility

Anyone can take part in this hackathon.

Judges

No avatar 100

Ed Marks
New Mexico Legal Aid

No avatar 100

Kulsum Ameji
Illinois Legal Aid

No avatar 100

Glenn Rawdon
Legal Services Corporation

No avatar 100

Dan Linna
Legal RnD

No avatar 100

Jeff Aresty
Internet Bar Organization

Judging Criteria

  • Judging Criteria
    How much impact (quality and quantity) could the solution have? Does the hack recognize current solutions and avoid replication? Does the hack employ a new/novel approach to solving the problem? Might the hack cause more harm than good?